Some window view drawings

With so many people around the world being forced to stay at home, our windows have taken on a much more profound and metaphoric function than ever before. In essence, they have become our primary point of visual contact with the world — a contact that both protects and separates us, but at the same time unites us.

This familiar hole in the wall, to which we had probably never paid much attention, has suddenly become an imposing snapshot of a moment — a huge and strange moment that we are living together from inside our homes and our selves.

Francesco Pozzoli, 13 years old, from Milan (Italy)

About a month ago, when Italy went into lockdown, on my Facebook page I asked people to share a drawing of their window view together with a short text. I’ve received many amazing contributions, many of which from kids. Check my Facebook page to view them — they convey a powerfully shared feeling of anxiety, suspension, nostalgia, and hope.

It would be wonderful if as many of you as possible, wherever you are around the world, contributed to this collection of viewpoints. Take a moment to observe what you see out your window and then try drawing it using the window to frame the view. Then write a paragraph describing it. What do you see? How far can you see (“far” both in space and time)? And how does the view reflect back on you? What do you notice that you hadn’t seen before?

Christian Rotella, 14 years old, from Borgaro Torinese (Italy)

Please share this post as much as possible. Then draw, tell, and share your window views! In the end we will have a collective vision of the world as seen through the eyes of a multitude of individuals who are sharing a common experience.

If you would like me to see your work (and perhaps share it), please mention my name or my Matteo Pericoli public page so I can find it; and please use the hashtags #mywindowview and #windowsontheworld.

Click here to view the post on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Pericoli.Matteo/posts/10157158797587083